New York City Diary

Words and pictures from my interesting life in New York.

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Location: Brooklyn, New York, United States

Sunday, November 27, 2005

Three Bridges



I call the above photo Three Bridges. I'm pleased with how it turned out, because at first I was afraid that the light was too bleak. Click to make it big. I shot it during a walk I took this afternoon to Grand Ferry Park in Brooklyn. The bridge in the foreground is the Williamsburg Bridge. The Manhattan Bridge is behind it, and if you look closely you can also see the Brooklyn tower of the Brooklyn Bridge in the background. To get this view I walked to the edge of the East River and faced south, and I was just barely able to get both towers of the Williamsburg Bridge in the frame. The cranes in the foreground on the far left belong to the Domino Sugar plant, which no longer uses them to unload sugar from boats. The barbed wire is an added touch. What do you think?

I was taking an afternoon stroll because Jenn had some work to do and I wanted to get out of her hair for a while. I grabbed my camera and walked down Metropolitan Avenue to the river, and then I walked back home taking South First Street to Marcy Avenue back to Metropolitan. Here's a photo I took of a garage with an interesting sign.



If you need your New Ork State Inspection, this place is on Metropolitan at Meeker Avenue. The only guy I can think of who would need that would be Mork from Ork.

I continued walking and decided to snap this picture of a church.



Then I figured I'd shoot the street signs, for orientation. Marcy and Metropolitan.



As I continued walking I noticed that a funky-looking tea shop called the Roebling Tea Room had opened on Metropolitan and Roebling Street. These images are part of a mural painted on the side of the building.



This one reminded me that I've got to get my bike fixed.



I kept on walking past the Old Dutch Mustard Company. I don't think they make mustard there anymore but I like the building.



Here's the mustard company's loading dock. There are so many buildings like this one that it's easy to imagine this neighborhood as the bustling industrial area it once was.



I took a left on Water Street and saw this decorated truck, which I simply had to photograph.



By the time I made it to Grand Ferry Park the batteries in the camera were almost dead, so I was very parsimonious with what I was shooting. Here's the same picture as the first one, except without the barbed wire. Which do you think is better?



I stopped by the grocery store on the way home and bought some chicken and vegetables to cook for dinner. It was nice to eat a home-cooked meal because we had been out to eat quite a bit in the last week. Last Saturday we ate with Jenn's friends at Nolita House. On Thanksgiving we ate at Arthur's Landing with Jenn's family. On Friday night we dined at Alta with Jenn's stepbrother and his new ladyfriend. And last night (Saturday night) Jenn and I cashed in a gift certificate we received as a wedding gift and had a phenomenal dinner at Fiamma, the first Michelin-starred restaurant I've (knowingly) dined in. Thank you Nicole for the wonderful gift. We had a great bottle of wine and enjoyed octopus as an appetizer. For entrees Jenn had the halibut, while I had duck. It was so succulent!

2 Comments:

Blogger Jenn said...

I like the barbed wire, but getting the three bridges in one shot-and in focus-is equally impressive.
And, yes, big thanks to Nicole for allowing us to check out the Michelin-starred Fiamma on someone else's tab.
And thanks to my husband for a home-cooked meal worthy of a Michelin star (and an afternoon to do my work).

11:24 PM  
Blogger Ted Madsen said...

I agree the barbed wire adds both perspective and some steel chaos contrasting against the rigid forms of the city and bridges, and the flowing tranquility of the river... I'm such a nerd!

Since I am a non-new Yorker but still work with the likes of the Charlie Palmer Group.. what is a Michelin star... sounds like a tire to me!

1:38 AM  

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